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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona found in the catalog.

Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona

by Waldo S. Glock

  • 117 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Fort Collins, Colo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil moisture -- Measurement,
  • Ponderosa pine -- Moisture,
  • Ponderosa pine -- Soils

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-27).

    Other titlesSoil moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona.
    Statementby Waldo S. Glock, Edward M. Gaines, and Sharlene R. Agerter.
    SeriesResearch paper RM -- 9., U.S. Forest Service research paper RM -- 9.
    ContributionsGaines, Edward M. 1913-, Agerter, Sharlene R.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination34 p. :
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17616700M
    OCLC/WorldCa851652

    and includes two ponderosa pine stands with contrasting tree densities. The two stands differed in tree density by more than an order of magnitude, with a density of trees ha 1 for the low-density ponderosa pine stand, and of tree ha 1 for the high-density stands. The high-density stands, a ‘doghair thicket’, apparently, was. Habitat: Ponderosa pine trees occur as pure stands or in mixed conifer forests in the mountains. It is an important component of the Interior Ponderosa Pine, Pacific Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir, and Pacific Ponderosa Pine forest cover types. In the northwest, it is typically associated with Rocky Mountain Douglas fir, lodgepole pine, grand fir, and.

    T1 - Tree size, stand density, and the source of water used across seasons by ponderosa pine in northern Arizona. AU - Kerhoulas, Lucy P. AU - Kolb, Thomas E. AU - Koch, George W. PY - .   Hardy and drought resistant, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) grows rapidly, and its roots dig deep into most types of soil. Ponderosa Pine Facts. Ponderosa pines are large trees native to the Rocky Mountain region of North America. A typical cultivated ponderosa pine grows to around 60 feet tall with a branch spread of about 25 feet.

    smaller ponderosa pines that dominate unthinned stands. 4) P. ponderosa trees use heartwood as a water source when soil water is depleted. b. Methodology The bulk of the work under this grant has examined how tree size and stand density affect the use of summer and winter precipitation by ponderosa pine in northern Arizona. The methods. Determining Ponderosa Pine Tree Density on Small Lots P Tom DeGomez, Forest Health Specialist, School of Natural Resources, University of Arizona ast land management practices have often resulted in ponderosa pine stands that are overly dense, growing offsite, and prone to catastrophic wildfire, drought or bark beetle outbreaks3,4,5.


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Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona by Waldo S. Glock Download PDF EPUB FB2

SOIL-MOISTURE FLUCTUATIONS UNDER TWO PONDEROSA PINE STANDS IN NORTHERN ARIZONA. [Glock, W., Et al., Photos, Graphs] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. SOIL-MOISTURE FLUCTUATIONS UNDER TWO PONDEROSA PINE STANDS IN NORTHERN : Et al. Glock, W. Get this from a library.

Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona. [Waldo S Glock; Edward M Gaines; Sharlene R Agerter; United States. Department of Agriculture.; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)] -- "Soil moisture, or the lack of it, is of great significance in the complex of factors that influence tree growth.

Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in nothern Arizona by Glock, Waldo S. (Waldo Sumner), cn ; Gaines, Edward M. (Edward McCulloch), ; Agerter, Sharlene RPages: Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona / By Waldo S.

(Waldo Sumner) Glock, Sharlene R. Agerter and Edward M. (Edward McCulloch) Gaines. Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in nothern Arizona / View Metadata By: Glock, Waldo S.

(Waldo Sumner), - Gaines, Edward M. (Edward McCulloch), - Agerter, Sharlene R. Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. Ponderosa Pine. Pinaceae -- Pine family. William W.

Oliver and Russell A. Ryker. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), also called western yellow pine, is one of the most widely distributed pines in western North America.A major source of timber, ponderosa pine forests are also important as wildlife habitat, for recreational use, and for esthetic values.

Ponderosa pine grows on a variety of soil types including igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary. It does best on coarse-textured soils when available soil moisture is limited. Ponderosa pine is seldom found growing naturally on heavytextured soils with a - high clay and/or silt content.

RM-RP New products from low-grade ponderosa pine timber. RM-RP Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona. RM-RP Volume tables and point-sampling factors for ponderosa pine in the Black Hills.

RM-RP Snow avalanches along Colorado mountain highways. Vegetation in ponderosa pine habitat types is usually limited by water availability. Ponderosa pine communities are often subject to drought [87,], although soil moisture regimes across ponderosa pine's distribution in the Northern Rocky Mountains range from moist to xeric [,].In this region, mean annual precipitation increases from east to west and south to north [47,].

Ponderosa pine is typically dominant on warm, dry sites with a short growing season and very low summer precipitation. Temperatures annual average 41° to 50° F with extremes ranging from ° to ° F.

Being drought tolerant, it out competes other species to. The future of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum) forests in the southwestern United States is uncertain because climate-change-induced stresses are expected to increase tree mortality and place greater constraints on ultural treatments, which include thinning, are increasingly being used to address forest health concerns by restoring ponderosa pine.

In the years following the arrival of Euro‐American settlers in northern Arizona, Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine) forests changed from open, low‐density stands to closed, high‐density stands. The increase in tree density has been detrimental to the vigor of old‐growth trees that established before settlement (presettlement trees).

Location of the Centennial Forest in Northern Arizona. ˜e two paired study watersheds wit areas of mi2 and mi2 are in the The Ponderosa Pine stand consists of small to mid-diameter trees (”) with average canopy cover of soil moisture content, other soil characteristics.

Kolb et al. () found similar results in an experimental study of ponderosa pine in northern Arizona. In an extensive analysis of more than 15 common tree species in the French Alps, Kunstler.

(and Gaines, Edward W. and Agerter, Sharlene R.) Soil-moisture fluctuations under two ponderosa pine stands in northern Arizona: Rocky Mountain Forest & Range Experimen­ tal Station Research Paper RM-9,34 pTip growth in trees of West Texas and Maryland: Advancing Frontiers of Plant Sciences [New Delhi], v.

9, p. Water Requirements for a Ponderosa Pine Tree. Native to the American West, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, U.S.

Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 3. Michael R. Wagner's 87 research works with 2, citations and 4, reads, including: Attraction to monoterpenes and beetle-produced compounds by syntopic Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles and. Notably, stand density in many semi‐arid forests has increased greatly because of fire suppression, such as that in the extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) forests that span much of western USA.

Few studies have quantified how soil water content varies in low‐ versus high‐density stands both by depth and years, or the inter. Past land management practices have often resulted in ponderosa pine stands that are overly dense and prone to catastrophic wildfire or bark beetle outbreaks Preventing a stand-replacing event is best accomplished through tree thinning.

Lower stand densities result in. Scientists from the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey have reconstructed the recent migration history of ponderosa pine trees in the central Rocky Mountains. Their recently published study on the movement of this species, through centuries and across complex terrain, is unprecedented in its methodology and scope.

The investigation informs an uncertain. between 4, feet, conditions of greater soil moisture exist than on areas of like elevation normally dominated by ponderosa pine. These are held to be natural lodgepole sites. Leighty concluded his observations by questioning the theory that fire is the cause of the pure lodgepole pine stands in the Pringle Falls area.Individual ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa) can live well over years.

Their extreme drought resistance stems from long “tap roots” that provide secure anchors that access soil moisture deep underground. Intolerant of shade from other trees, ponderosa pines are most successful in .PONDEROSA PINE Pinus ponderosa P.

& C. Lawson Plant Symbol = PIPO Contributed by: USDA NRCS Plant Materials Program Alternate Names western yellow pine, yellow pine, bull pine, blackjack Uses Beautification: This is a handsome tree for purposes of beautification but due to its height should not be grown within road rights-of-way.